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Overhead Miking

Overhead Miking

There are two ways to view overheads:

The main stereo pair- gives you the bulk of the drum sound, with maybe kick and snare added for reinforcement. Usually very natural (though Bonham twisted them into a force of nature), but requires very nice mics in a very nice sounding room. Most commonly used in jazz, though it's becoming more popular in other genres.

The cymbals-only approach- you just want to pick up the cymbals, using close micing for the rest of the kit. You can roll off everything under 500-800Hz and just have your cymbals left, along with a little bit of attack from the drums. This is probably heard the most on radio today.

Try both methods, experiment, and find out which one works best for you. You will probably end up using both for different sounds


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